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Contact

3M-NANO 2019 Secretariat:

3M-NANO@cust.edu.cn
3m.nano.secretariat@gmail.com

Phone: +86 431 85582926
Mobile: +86 13578985670
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  Keynote Speakers  
 

*The list of Keynote speakers is based on the alphabetical order of family names

 

 

F. John Burpo

Professor

Head of Department and Professor U.S. Military Academy

Army Branch: Field Artillery
United States Military Academy

USA

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Xi Chen

Assistant Professor

CUNY Advanced Science Research Center

Department of Chemical Engineering
The City College of New York

USA

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Xiaodong Chen

Professor

School of Materials Science and Engineering

Nanyang Technological University

Singaore

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Sonia Antoranz Contera

Professor 


Clarendon Laboratory

Department of Physics
University of Oxford

United Kingdom

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Peer Fischer

Professor 

Max Planck Research Group Leader

Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems
University of Stuttgart

Germany

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Qiang He

Professor

Micro/Nanotechnology Research Center

Harbin Institute of Technology
China

 

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Title: Self-propelled swimming nanomachines for biomedical applications

Abstract: Current drug nanocarriers have potential to perform targeted drug delivery since they can achieve longer systemic circulation so that more drugs can be deposited at the tumor site through the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Although various nanocarriers have been successfully used to deliver drugs, the targeting ratios are still very low since they cannot actively seek the tumor site and also lack a propelling force to penetrate the tumor beyond their normal diffusion limit. Inspired by natural swimmers (e.g. bateria), our group focuses on the design of synthetic swimming nanomachines which have ability of converting chemical energy or various physical stimuli into autonomous motion in fluids. These as-assembled nanomachines are able to be served as both autonomous motor and smart cargo, performing drug loading, targeted transportation and remote controlled release in the vicinity of cells and tissues in an organism. Such swimming nanomachines may provide a new trend in the design of next-generation drug delivery for actively seeking sites of diseases and targeted drug transport.


 

Zheng Liu

Associate Professor 

Centre for Micro-/Nano-electronics (NOVITAS)

School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Nanyang Technological University

Singapore

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Kenji Matsuda

Professor 

Department of Synthetic Chemistry and Biological Chemistry

Graduate School of Engineering
Kyoto University

Japan

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Hiroshi Onishi

Professor

Chemistry Department

Kobe University

Program Officer

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science


Japan

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Title: Pico-Newton Force Sensing at Liquid-Solid Interfaces: Application to Lubricants

Abstract:


 

Philippe Poulin

Professor

Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal - CNRS

University of Bordeaux

France

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Xin Su

Senior Associate Editor

Wiley-VCH

Weinheim, Germany
Senior Associate Editor

Angewandte Chemie, Germany

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Weihong Tan

Distinguished Professor, V. T. and Louise Jackson Professor of Chemistry

University of Florida

USA

Vice President and Director
State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics

Hunan University, China

Academician, Chinese Academy of Sciences

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Ben Zhong Tang

Stephen K. C. Cheong Professor of Science

Chair Professor of Chemistry

Chair Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Academician, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Fellow, Royal Society of Chemistry


The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

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Yoshito Tobe

Professor

Division of Frontier Materials Science

Department of Materials Engineering Science
Graduate School of Engineering Science

Osaka University

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Jussi Toppari

Professor 

Department of Physics

Nanoscience Center
University of Jyväskylä

Finland

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Title: Plasmonic Nanostructures and Single Electron Devices Based on DNA Constructions

Abstract: The molecular electronics as well as molecular scale optics (via plasmonics), have long been visualized to pose the next huge leap in technology development. Even not fully realized yet, the promises of these nanotechnologies are certainly getting closer to be fulfilled. The most crucial issues in realization of functional molecular scale electrical devices is to find both molecular conductors as well as suitable building blocks and scaffolds, for nanoscale assembly. For nano-optics the plasmonic nanostructures have shown high potent due to their unique optical properties such as field enhancement and possibilities for subwavelength optics. However, due to limitations of the conventional nanofabrication methods, nanostructures with tunable plasmonic/optical activity in visible range are hard to realize, especially in large amounts. At the moment, DNA has proven to be a very versatile and promising molecule for nanoscale patterning. Quickly developing techniques based on DNA self-assembly provide precise and programmable ways to form electrical molecule scale devices as well as plasmonic nanoscale structures, even in large quantities. Yet, in the respect of the long history and debate on the possibly conductivity of DNA itself, the electrical properties of DNA-based structures are also of a great interest.

We have studied the conductance of several types of individual DNA nanostructures and found that even the electrical conductivity of DNA-helix as such, seems to be too fragile to be directly utilized, the multilayered 3D DNA origami structures may have improved properties. However, more robust realization of DNA-based electrical devices, relies on other components and uses DNA as only a scaffold. Hence, we have utilized DNA nanostructures to assemble a row of gold nanoparticles (AuNP). The whole entity is further trapped between metallic electrodes where AuNPs act as metallic islands to form a single electron transistor (SET). Due to small size of the islands, this SET could work even at room temperature in contrast to the usually needed kryogenic temperatures. For nanoscale optics, we have developed a novel method, which takes advantage of the DNA origami constructions and together with conventional nanofabrication processes enabling fabrication of high quality sub-100-nanometer plasmonic nanostructures with desired shapes. As a demonstration, we have fabricated optical bowtie antennas with a tunable plasmonic resonance in visible range. The method is highly parallel, which enabled us to fabricate also optically chiral surface with high coverage. This ability to fabricate metallic nanoparticles with designed shape in high quantities provides great potential in various applications, especially sensing and metamaterial fabrication.


 

Takayuki Uchihashi

Professor 

Laboratoy of Biomolecular Dynamics and Function

Department of Physics
Nagoya Unversity

Japan

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Title: Real-time nanoscale visualization of biological molecules at work with high-speed atomic force microscopy

Abstract: Biological molecules fulfil a wide variety of unique functions. Their functions are essentially elicited from conformational change and/or interactions with other molecules which are often triggered by binding of ligand/substrate and changes in the external environment. Therefore, studying dynamic processes on individual molecules is indispensable to gain mechanistic insight into biological molecules. Nevertheless, a tool with an ability to directly record both conformational changes and dynamic molecular interactions in real time at single-molecule resolution has not been available. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile technique to study nanoscale structures of materials under various environments. One of the most coveted new functions of AFM is “fast recording” because it allows the observation of dynamic processes occurring at the nanoscale. The visualization of dynamic processes provides direct and deep insights into the target objects and phenomena under the microscope. This new capability of observation should open a new opportunity to reveal essential mechanisms of working proteins. In this talk, we demonstrate some applications of high-speed AFM to imaging of dynamics of single molecules, living cells and dynamic process at solid/liquid interface.


 

 


Kislon Voïtchovsky

Associate Professor

Director of the Durham Centre for Soft Matter


Physics Department
Durham University

UK

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*The list of Keynote speakers is based on the alphabetical order of family names