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3M-NANO 2019 Secretariat:

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3m.nano.secretariat@gmail.com

Phone: +86 431 85582926
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  Keynote Speakers  
 

 

Peer Fischer

Professor 

Max Planck Research Group Leader

Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems
University of Stuttgart

Germany

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Title:

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Qiang He

Professor

Micro/Nanotechnology Research Center

Harbin Institute of Technology
China

 

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Title: Self-propelled swimming nanomachines for biomedical applications

Abstract: Current drug nanocarriers have potential to perform targeted drug delivery since they can achieve longer systemic circulation so that more drugs can be deposited at the tumor site through the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Although various nanocarriers have been successfully used to deliver drugs, the targeting ratios are still very low since they cannot actively seek the tumor site and also lack a propelling force to penetrate the tumor beyond their normal diffusion limit. Inspired by natural swimmers (e.g. bateria), our group focuses on the design of synthetic swimming nanomachines which have ability of converting chemical energy or various physical stimuli into autonomous motion in fluids. These as-assembled nanomachines are able to be served as both autonomous motor and smart cargo, performing drug loading, targeted transportation and remote controlled release in the vicinity of cells and tissues in an organism. Such swimming nanomachines may provide a new trend in the design of next-generation drug delivery for actively seeking sites of diseases and targeted drug transport.


 

Zheng Liu

Associate Professor 

Centre for Micro-/Nano-electronics (NOVITAS)

School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Nanyang Technological University

Singapore

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Hiroshi Onishi

Professor

Chemistry Department

Kobe University

Program Officer

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science


Japan

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Xin Su

Senior Associate Editor

Wiley-VCH

Weinheim, Germany
Senior Associate Editor

Angewandte Chemie, Germany

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Benzhong Tang

Stephen K. C. Cheong Professor of Science

Chair Professor of Chemistry

Chair Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Member, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Fellow, Royal Society of Chemistry


The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

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Takayuki Uchihashi

Professor 

Laboratoy of Biomolecular Dynamics and Function

Department of Physics
Nagoya Unversity

Japan

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Title: Real-time nanoscale visualization of biological molecules at work with high-speed atomic force microscopy

Abstract: Biological molecules fulfil a wide variety of unique functions. Their functions are essentially elicited from conformational change and/or interactions with other molecules which are often triggered by binding of ligand/substrate and changes in the external environment. Therefore, studying dynamic processes on individual molecules is indispensable to gain mechanistic insight into biological molecules. Nevertheless, a tool with an ability to directly record both conformational changes and dynamic molecular interactions in real time at single-molecule resolution has not been available. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile technique to study nanoscale structures of materials under various environments. One of the most coveted new functions of AFM is “fast recording” because it allows the observation of dynamic processes occurring at the nanoscale. The visualization of dynamic processes provides direct and deep insights into the target objects and phenomena under the microscope. This new capability of observation should open a new opportunity to reveal essential mechanisms of working proteins. In this talk, we demonstrate some applications of high-speed AFM to imaging of dynamics of single molecules, living cells and dynamic process at solid/liquid interface.